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Top TV Programs Underrepresent Women Over 50

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Demi Moore in Brave New World

In a brand new study from Nielsen the global media giant, they highlight the problem of women over 50 in TV Shows. The study finds that women beyond 50 are underrepresented on major TV shows, and how they’re seen. They often assume traditional gender roles, according to custom research by Gracenote Inclusion Analytics, which was recently launched.

Even if women are making up more than half of the population of the United States, Gracenote Inclusion Analytics indicates that males spend more time on screen versus women (62 percent viewing time vs. 38 percent). However, women over the age of 50, who account for 20% of the nation, spend only 8% of their time on screens.

Assume Traditional Roles

As women over the age of 50 are cast in television programs, the plots often revolve around matriarchal and maternal concepts. In contrast, suspense, getting away, and mysterious circumstances, action, and custody battles were the top trends in shows with a largely female cast, but no female cast members over 50. Women in their 50s rarely find themselves portrayed in content. Yet when they do, they frequently see a person who does not represent their multi-faceted significance or reality.

Women over 50 have a wide range of expectations when it comes to what they’d like to on television. They want to see their age group represented on TV. Women of any age are a wide variety of amazing things, not just housewives.

It’s time that Hollywood considers this generation of women for what they are. Why only young people can play all the exciting and multi-layered roles? We have many great actresses who are extremely talented and have passed over the age of 50. We should not let them fade away. Just because they got a little bit older, it doesn’t mean they are less talented.

Source: PRNewswire

Cover: Photo by: Steve Schofield/Peacock

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How Hollywood got involved in violence against Asians in the United States

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How Hollywood got involved in violence against Asians in the United States


Reading the comments is not a good idea. But when I opened a breaking tweet about the terrible murders that took place across Atlanta, including six Asian women working at three spas on March 16, the overwhelming identity of the replies was inevitable, angry, and instructive. “It’s not the happy ending they expected,” one exclaimed. “Then, is there a happy ending?” Asked someone else. “Of course it’s not a happy ending.” He threw a stick figure gif by drumming “Hey!” while making another declaration. Read the rimshot so that anyone can understand that they want them to laugh. Endless tweets of the same snark, each tried to be the first but failed because so many others have beaten them. People continued to react to news of Asian women dying from jokes about pain.

This reaction is terrible, but it is not surprising. Reducing Asians into flat, strongly accented caricatures is a favorite pastime in the country and has been around for decades. It is so common to mock an Asian male as a weak, feminine person that makes it a white noise for those who listen to it. Asian women have long been reduced to inhuman stereotypes, whether they are meek, silent, or aggressively sexual robots, or robots that appear to serve white American men.

On the screen, these patterns persist at a constant frequency. One of the most persistent portrayals of Asian women in American cinema is still a Vietnamese prostitute in Stanley Kubrick’s “Full Metal Jacket”. He teased two US soldiers and said, “I’m so excited”, “I’m annoyed.” “I love you for a long time.” She told white Americans, “Everything [they] If she’s not, countless other movies and shows show too willingness to show the violence she can endure. (Listen to the “Family Guy” episode. Watch an episode that wasn’t fortunate enough to run through the cables recently. In this episode, dozens of Asian women ran away in their underwear, drowning in Quagmire’s trunks and garages. Quagmire was To yourself, “They are tagged.”) Comedy, drama, police proceedings, all genres rely on the shocking values ​​of a sex worker who has died or is endangered. Many of these are anonymous Asian women who receive little more nuances or humanity than their basic explanation. .

In particular, comedy is inclined to let “Asians” play a key role in itself, and if you don’t like it, You The problem of not getting jokes. It didn’t get more instinctive online hatred than in 2019 I wrote about the comedian’Saturday Night Live’, which was hired before the history of racist’comedy’. Specifically for Asians, they maliciously fired him. His early defense was a classic for comedians who faced some backlash. Sorry if he pissed anyone off, but he was working on pushing the boundaries I disagreed and said that his attempts were bad and boring about repeating the tiring stereotypes in search of kneeling laughter. Accordingly, the fans called me a joyful penis. Still, it was nothing compared to the wall of violent harassment I received because my Asian-American colleagues shouted the same racism or, in other words, did not accept the fact that they should be the subject of jokes. The ensuing racist Vitriol made it so clear that such a “comedy” of Asian accents, food, and mannerisms is not rooted in those who want to laugh, but rather that they want to claim dominance over the laughable culture. The topic of the joke that fights back is not part of the core, so it’s an unacceptable buzz kill.

Whether or not people who are smart about Asians recognize it or not, they are helping to dehumanize the entire population for no reason other than their immediate gratification. And frankly, giving the advantage of doubting “whether they realize it or not” would actually be too generous given the ample evidence that how many people are realizing exactly what they’re doing.

The most striking recent examples come from the top. Whenever Donald Trump as President of the United States speaks of COVID-19, he intentionally did not use the word “coronavirus” when he could say “Chinese”. At the rally, he called the virus “kung flu” and winked at cameras almost everywhere. Hate crimes against Asian Americans immediately skyrocketed, but it didn’t matter for the heads of the world’s largest platforms. Using hostile punch lines turned Asians into convenient scapegoats. This is a distraction that is totally worth it from your own failures.

Turning the virus into a joke at the expense of the Asians is particularly effective because it is easy to dismiss criticism by explaining it as Trump’s sense of humor. In November, Dave Chapelle admired his pun called’Kung Flu’. “SNL” monologue open, Trump called him “Racist, funny motherfucker” who beat him with a perfectly good punch line. Chapelle spoke directly to Trump. He went on to argue that “what you are saying is wrong,” making his claim as a comedian capable of making racist remarks as long as there is an end to the joke. He doesn’t seem to pause for a moment to think that no matter who says it could be wrong. The end result is the same and we rule out racism just because we found a way to make it stand out.

So no: it’s not particularly shocking to glance at news stories about murdered Asian women and see the numerous reactions that laugh at whether their life was a happy ending or not. It’s a terrible but obviously typical sign of some sort of accidental contempt that leads to such meaningless violence every day. Just because the point is expected doesn’t mean it’s not bad, and Asian Americans shouldn’t say so much about their friends, coworkers, or Hollywood as a whole.

And no: not falling into racist jokes points to hatred for what it is, not suppressing freedom of speech. As much as laughter can be a tonic, terrible moments like this have proven how effective laughing at someone can wield them even on vulnerable people when they laugh at their pain, history, and humanity. In particular, cheap attempts at cheap jokes aren’t worth it.





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SAG Awards Was Streaming Success: Column

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SAG Awards Was Streaming Success: Column


So far, here are a few examples of awards shows that do their best to achieve something like a traditional experience for viewers at home more than a year deep on the social turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

What we didn’t see exactly was a show that decided to rely on the alienation and isolation of the past 13 months and install everything remotely. After the Emmy and Golden Globes (both had a lot of large area elements and worked hard to convince us that it was worth the time), the audience could be forgiven for being exhausted. Viewers wondering what a true social distancing awards show will look like will have gotten a good response at this year’s Film Actors Guild Awards.

This year’s SAG was a short time (just an hour), but it’s elegantly crafted. There were no hosts, but celebrities started the show, and it continued to open in the process. The show is notorious among awards ceremonies, which opened as a monologue of SAG cardholders. This year, Daveed Diggs, Jimmy Fallon, Helen Mirren, Rita Moreno and others looked into the baffling early headshots between awards ceremonies. They also spoke of hope for the next year, deep in consciousness (Mirren started the segment by saying he couldn’t wait to be in the cinema).

All of this would have been an elegant springboard around winners who don’t have to. It may be unfair to evaluate the awards ceremony with the speeches of the winners, but stars including Daniel Kaluuya (“Judas and the Black Messiah”) and Viola Davis (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) have stepped up. And Yoon Yeo-jung of “Minari” was created not only for the surprise winner, but also for an attractive zoom presence.

Like all awards ceremonies of this era, it was a show that took time to learn how to watch. (Citizens having a hard time knowing how to log off at a remote working meeting can only relate to losing a trapped candidate with the one who won the trapped candidate in the Zoom room.) However, the tension between speeches, especially compared to their closest rivals. Becoming a venerable television franchise. Not only were the Golden Globes less skillfully crafted, they also had a lot less sensitivity to opportunities (dropping audio at critical moments). Globes exhausted its viewers, forcing the stars to evoke enthusiasm and hours of presence in a consciousness that couldn’t exist in real life.

In contrast, the SAG Awards is a show with top-of-the-line audience rating awards. It’s the people who need to know who’s ahead of the Oscar race or if they’ll be able to win an Emmy next time. However, they have also been praised by more than 100,000 union members given to the actors to the actors. In times of pandemic and many other social illnesses, this trophy may seem less urgent than ever. After all, the Oscars are also fluid. However, SAG Awards organizers insisted on solidarity, held shows, and made their claim in a year when the red carpet and seated dinner weren’t an option. They conveyed a ritual that emphasized thoughtfulness and generosity of the mind.





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Hulu, Tribeca documentary’The State of Texas vs. Melissa’ argument

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Hulu, Tribeca documentary'The State of Texas vs.  Melissa' argument


Hulu featured in a timely documentary by Sabrina Van Tassel named Tribeca in 2020 “The State of Texas vs. It has won US streaming rights for “Melissa” and has received many acclaim, including the Raindance Best Documentary Award.

Hulu acquired a documentary representing theatrical and digital rights to North American, British, and Irish films from FilmRise.

“The State of Texas vs. Melissa” is set to premiere in North America this year at Tribeca. The festival re-invited the film with other titles selected in 2020.

The French premiere takes place at the Deauville American Film Festival. Alba Films will release a documentary in France on September 29 following Deauville.

In addition to Tribeca, Raindance, and Deauville, it has been selected in more than 20 festivals including Cinequest, Golden Gate Film Festival, DocLondon, Fipadoc, Frigra, Madrid Human Rights Film Fest, and more. It has also won awards at Madrid, DocLondon and Golden Gate Film Festivals.

Located in the heart of South Texas’ Latino community, the film explores the life and trials of Melissa Lucio, the first Hispanic woman to be sentenced to death in the state of Texas, which has executed the most executions in the United States since 1976. The accusation of the abuse and subsequent death of a two-year-old daughter has been sentenced to death for 13 years. The film shows how the system has been superimposed on Lucio, from court-appointed attorneys who did not present specific evidence to district attorneys sentenced to 13 years in prison for bribery and corruption.

Lucio’s conviction was overturned by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in July 2019, but Texas immediately appealed the verdict. And in February, the Court of Appeals canceled the approval of relief in 2019 by 10-7, and now there is hope for an exemption in the U.S. Supreme Court, which accounts for only 1% of all cases. Lucio can receive an execution date at any time.

“When I started the movie, I knew it was a timely piece. Now every choice, every article is an opportunity to make a sound about her case,” said Van Tassel. The film director, who quoted Ava DuVernay’s work as inspiration, especially “When They See Us”, “is the best example of how art can bring awareness, make a difference, and make a decisive impact.

In recent months, “The State of Texas vs. Melissa” has gained support from American philanthropists and social justice activists. These include Jason Flom, founder of Lava Records, the Innocence Project director and creator of the podcast Wrongful Conviction. Flom invited Van Tassel to his podcast on June 2.

Flom said Variety “Melissa Lucio’s terrible case is a terrible example of just how much our criminal law system really broke down.”

“She was the victim of an evil and corrupt prosecutor currently serving in federal prison. Attorneys who are incompetent and likely to compromise; Junk science; And best of all-it’s a society where the odds for her build up from birth,” Flom said.

Quoting New York-based philanthropists Cameron Todd Willingham and Robert Pruett, “Texas has a long and tortured history of executing innocent people. And a tragic end.”

“The State of Texas vs. Melissa” launches today (April 15th) at Hulu. Produced by Vito Films and co-produced by Tahli Films with Andaman Films.





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